Frog Control in the Office

Once upon a time, on a desk not very far away, A large frog was lurking.

The frog’s owner knew that she needed to eat it, but it was just so big.

It hadn’t been very big when she got it.  In fact, it had seemed manageable.  But like most things, it had grown the longer she had kept it.

She nibbled away at it a couple of times.

Each time, the frog seemed to grow smaller and yet, the very next morning, it had grown again overnight.

This happened several times until the frog grew so large that it took over the desk.

She couldn’t see the desk for the frog.

Her whole day was blighted by the pesky amphibian.

Every day she woke up and she felt that frog, lurking in her office next door.  In the night she was sure she heard it croaking.

Every day she took a nibble at it but the deadline for delivering the frog got shorter, and the creature just got bigger, longer, and, frankly, was beginning to look quite nasty.  She wasn’t at all keen on eating him.  But she’d promised the client she’d deliver, and deliver she must.

The next day, she marched into the office and she got hold of that frog.  She struggled to lift him off the desk.  She struggled to get her mouth around his horrible, scaly leg, but she took a deep breath and bit really, really hard.  She took a really big bite, and she chewed and she chewed.  And then she took another bite.  And another.  And the frog started to look a bit smaller.  She put him down on the desk for a moment to review her progress and realised he had only got two legs now.  He didn’t fill the desk any more.  The sense of achievement outweighed the taste of amphibian.  So, with renewed energy, she bit, and tore and chewed in an effort to get through the task.

But still, the deadline was short and the frog was large.  There was only so much frog that one person could eat in the time available.  So she decided that she had no other option than to find someone who enjoyed eating frogs and delegate some of the work to them.  Quickly she looked up Virtual Assistants on Google and lo, there were several.  Choosing the most qualified in her sector, she quickly engaged her to take control of the parts of the frog she just could not bring herself to eat.

Having delegated part of the task it now seemed much more manageable and she chewed and tore her way through the parts of the frog she still needed to eat whilst her assistant tackled the parts she had been delegated.

Soon the frog was gone.  That last bite tasted almost sweet.   Just in time for the deadline too.

And they both lived happily ever after, working together to deal with the frogs in her business before they became too large to manage.

If you’ve got a frog, try and eat it before it grows too large.

If your frog is already too large, why not delegate some of the work to your local VA.

Jenni: Eating the frogs that others do not have time to digest.  You can contact me here for support with your frog.   HR Support Frogs are a particular speciality.

A Slimmer Inbox Fast

A Slimmer In Box Fast.  Email Management.  InBox management

One of my regularly requested services is In Box taming because they can so easily, and quickly, get out of control.  Even VA’s aren’t immune to multiplying emails when things get busy, so we understand how the inbox can quickly get to a point where it feels difficult to manage.  Being able to find and move multiple emails into a designated folder location within Gmail whilst also removing them from the InBox so that it is slimmer and easier to negotiate is a really great trick to have in your toolbox.  It’s also a trick you can use for deleting multiple emails.

Labels are the equivalent of a folder and are a great way to ensure the emails you do want to keep are safely stored.  By default, emails usually have a label of InBox, (even if you add new labels) and removing that Inbox label so the email goes to its allocated folder and ceases to lurk in the Inbox isn’t super obvious.  You would think you’d remove it under Labels on the ribbon bar, but you don’t.

The first step is to create a Folder/Label for your emails to be stored in.  Name it something easy and clear such as Client X.

GMail, GMail Tips, GMail Labels, Organised Inbox

The option for labels is on the top ribbon bar.  As you can see, you can create a new label.  Click this and an option to name the label will come up together with the option to nest the label under another to create a file hierarchy.  So one option is to create a folder labelled Clients and perhaps nest a folder label for Client X under this.

Now you have your label you can go and find all your emails relating to Client X.  There are several ways to search for emails. The most obvious, though not the quickest, is to search in the search box.  This can bring up emails you don’t want as it draws in emails that mention the person as well as emails to and from them.  Useful in certain circumstances but not necessarily ideal when you are trying to streamline an inbox.

If you have conversation view selected your emails will be organised to an extent though you may still have multiple conversations running with the same person.

To quickly find all emails on the same subject, right-click on an email and then select ‘Find emails with this subject’. Gmail will now show you both the received and sent emails with the same topic.

You use a similar method to find emails from the same sender.   Just right-click on the email and select “Find Emails From…”  Be aware that choosing the sender will only show received emails so your replies won’t get drawn into the search results.  Good for newsletters or informative emails that you want to keep, not so good for conversation threads.

GMail Tips, GMail, GMail Labels, GMail find multiple messages

Once you have your search results, tick the box just above the emails on the left side and this will highlight and tick all the emails you’ve found. You can then go to Labels and add the correct label to the emails or right click to get the menu shown below and choose “Label As”.  If there are some emails you don’t want to move to that label, just untick those before you choose your label and they won’t be labelled.

Now for the magic bit; evicting them from your Inbox.  The label “InBox” doesn’t show on the list of labels so you can’t just remove the label that way.  Instead, keeping the relevant emails ticked, go up to your email menu bar, choose Archive and your inbox label is magically removed, streamlining your inbox in one click.  Or, right-click and choose Archive from the menu as shown above.  Clever or what?

For those of you dealing with a seriously overweight inbox, it can be helpful to temporarily instruct Gmail to show 50 items so that you can examine and move as many messages as possible in one go.  To do this, click the three dots on the section of inbox you are trying to thin out (usually the Everything Else section) and you can choose the number of items it will show.

For very obese inboxes you may well need to do multiple searches for the same information to get all the items into the right folder and delete the antiques leaving only the collectables behind.

You can use a similar approach if you want to put your Gmail on a strict diet.  Find your target emails, highlight all, untick anything you actually want to keep, then instead of labelling the messages, delete them.  Once you’ve deleted a few screens worth, don’t forget to go into the Trash can and empty that out to permanently delete things, otherwise they may well hang about longer than you’d like them to, taking up storage space you could use for other things.  Particularly important if you deal with sensitive information as I sometimes do.  You want that information completely gone, not lurking in the trash can.

In the past, I’ve recommended apps that can unsubscribe you from newsletters and so forth to try to keep the level of incoming mail to a manageable level. However, there have been issues with at least one of these services selling personal data so now I recommend unsubscribing yourself from things manually, as they come up in your inbox.  Yes, it takes longer, but at least you don’t get zillions of offers of stuff you don’t need from companies you’d not want to use, who purchased your data so they can spam your inbox with rubbish.

A further option for newsletters and other interesting information is to have a folder into which you can move emails that might be needed in the future.  However, for some people, including me, this renders the information “out of sight, out of mind” and they rarely, if ever, visit the folder to retrieve the information, so this is one to treat with care and a realistic understanding of your own working practices.

Hopefully, this will help you to slim down your Gmail inbox to manageable proportions and once you have it under control you might find some useful tips here on keeping it slim and efficient.

Alternatively, if you are one of those people whose inbox is so huge that it contains every email you’ve ever received or sent, and you just can’t see where to start, why not call in an expert VA to get that bad boy sorted and under control, and set up some systems that will work for you, so you can keep it to a healthy weight in future.  Click here to contact me to discuss your requirements.

Elves in the Workplace: The Role of Elven Resources

He speeds through the sky in his sleigh, delivering gifts to every good little boy and girl in the world. He’s done it for so many years that he makes it look effortless.  But have you ever stopped to consider how much organisation lies behind the magic of Santa Claus and his amazing Christmas Eve exploits?

Naturally, Santa Claus uses VA’s throughout the year;  it’s the most flexible and cost-effective way to ensure everything is organised properly and happens on schedule.  He has a team of them and you can read about how they support him here and here.  These helpful souls ensure that everything from the sleigh maintenance to the warehouse stock control are kept rigorously under control.

In most cases, Santa needs only two or three of each type of VA.  The exception to this is his Elven Resources Support.  In common with many business owners, Santa Claus uses external Elven Resources Consultants and HR VA’s to help him to ensure he remains on the right side of the law, acts in a fair and reasonable way toward his staff of Elves, recruits effectively and without bias, and of course provides a safe, fair and inclusive environment.  Despite the speed at which he drives that sleigh, Santa is basically a law-abiding gentleman and in addition, he is deeply compassionate and really cares for his team of Elves and reindeer.  Even when those same Elves are testing his patience to its limits.

Elves, Elven Resources, Christmas Elves, Elf-On-The-Shelf

Santa’s Elven Resources Support staff is quite numerous.  The reason for this is simple;  Elves are, how shall we put it politely?  A bit giddy.  All the time.  But especially in the run-up to Christmas.  Elves can test the patience of the most saintly person and even Santa Claus is not immune to frustration when faced with a deputation of Elves complaining about an Elf cooking fish in the warehouse microwave and stinking up the room.

Every year the ER department and an increasingly irascible Santa are forced to add new and sometimes very specific, clauses into the ever-expanding Staff Handbook and the Elf and Safety Handbook.  Clauses which have been added in 2019 include:

“Elves that pin other Elves slippers (or any other part of an Elf or an Elf’s clothing) to any inanimate object will be disciplined”.

“Shaving rude words into the Reindeer’s fur whilst they sleep will not be tolerated”

“Do NOT tie, stick or pin anything to the Reindeer, especially not other Elves”

“Do not place fake dog turds on the conveyor belt”

“Elves may not ride on the conveyor belt”

“Joyriding in the sleigh is a disciplinary offence”

“Do not pin “Kick Me Hard” notices to the back of Santa’s jacket.

Elves, Elven Resources, Elf-On-The-Shelf

And so it goes on.  And every year, partly to assuage their frustration, the Elven Resources Department creates an informal top ten of the most interesting and original disciplinary cases they’ve dealt with.  Because when it comes to Elves, you just never know what they are going to do next.

And here, for your delectation, are the top ten for 2019

10 – the Elf that tied Rudolph’s legs together whilst he slept and then videoed poor Rudolph waking up and falling over.

9 – The Elf that broke wind in the cafeteria and tried to light it, causing damage to himself and the floor when he dropped the match and it set fire to his slippers and the carpet.

8 – The Elves that had a fistfight over whether one of them had let the other Elf’s chair down half a inch whilst the Elf in question was out at lunch.

7- The elves that sneaked into the Jewellery warehouse and were caught on CCTV getting very friendly indeed.

6 – The elf that sneaked into the cafeteria and put vodka into the water carafes so that all the Elves got drunk and had to be sent home.

5 – the Admin Elf who didn’t know how to process orders.  Rather than ask, he hid the orders in the cupboard.  Something that was only discovered when Stock Control VA realised that the 14 million LOL dolls she’d ordered had not arrived, and had subsequently sold out across the world, causing a large number of children to be disappointed on Christmas Day.

4- The elf that claimed his mother had died four times this year in order to gain extra time off.

3- The elf with a bad back who posted a video of herself on Facebook, waterskiing in the Bahamas during her sick leave.

2- The Elf that shaved the word Poop into Blitzens’ fur whilst she slept.

1 – The Elf that got drunk at the office party, stripped naked and streaked around the room. When Santa Claus intervened, the Elf threw up on Santa Claus’ boots.

As you can imagine, with all these Elf-y amusements going on, there is a great need for HR VA’s who can keep a straight face and take rapid notes in grievance hearings and disciplinaries.  Elves talk as fast as they move, so speed is of the essence in capturing the key points of the discussion and writing them up clearly and rapidly after the meeting.  To read more about the importance of note-taking in such meetings, go here.

If you’ve enjoyed this blog, do check out some of my other Christmas posts, including this one, which is also HR Related.  Of course, you may prefer to check out my more serious, and probably more useful, posts also.  And if you are looking for a VA with HR experience, or just a VA with a sense of humour and a love of organisation, get in touch.  You can contact me here.

The 12 days of C-HR-istmas

As we count down to Christmas, for those who celebrate it, I do like to provide a little light relief.  Last year it was Santa’s VA which you can read about here and here.  This year it’s the 12 days of C-HR -istmas.  A short, light-hearted gallop through some of the issues that HR might find itself involved with.  Naturally names, where used, have been changed.

Doughnuts, treats, On the first day of Christmas HR dealt with:

The man who loved doughnuts way, way too much.  In a very physical way.

date night, holding hands, relationships HROn the second day of Christmas HR dealt with:

John and Daisy being exceptionally friendly in the stationery cupboard.  If only they’d locked the door.  If only Doris from Accounts had not chosen that moment to break her stapler and go in search of a new one.

Fight, office fight, HR issuesOn the third day of Christmas HR dealt with;

A fist-fight between Russ and John in the middle of the cafeteria.  Russ had thought that he was happily married until he heard that his wife, Daisy, had been found in the stationery cupboard with John.

Office party. HR ChallengeOn the  fourth day of Christmas HR dealt with:

The fall out from the office party:  four vomiting sales personnel, three complaints about inappropriate behaviour, two photocopied bottoms, one MD with a black eye, and the junior staff member who launched the unprovoked attack on the MD.

Fish office complaints HROn the fifth day of Christmas HR dealt with:

A deputation of 5 staff complaining about Tim cooking fish in the office microwave and stinking up the office.

sleep, bed, relaxation, health, HR challengeOn the sixth day of Christmas HR dealt with:

The woman who rang in to ask how many sick days she had and could she take one today as she was really tired and didn’t want to come to work.

On the seventh day of Christmas HR dealt with:

The person who thought it would be amusing to add pornographic images to their Health and Safety Powerpoint presentation.

dancing, party, On the eighth day of Christmas, HR dealt with:

The person who was really unwell with flu and couldn’t make it into work but had managed to find the strength to drag himself to the local nightclub where he was seen by several co-workers dancing with energy and enthusiasm.

drinking, alcohol, HR challengeOn the ninth day of Christmas, HR dealt with;

The woman whose carafe of water had something more interesting than water in it.

On the tenth day of Christmas, HR dealt with:

The man who thought it would be amusing to give a box of chocolate willies to a young female co-worker as a secret santa gift.

office chair, office politics, office complaints, HROn the eleventh day of Christmas, HR dealt with:

8 people who all arrived mob handed to complain that Alice the temp had sat on Tarquin’s office chair and altered the height of it even though the team had all told her not to do so.

On the twelfth day of Christmas, HR dealt with:

Bob and Sadie.  Bob made himself a cup of tea in Sadie’s mug, which apparently had Sadie’s name on it and everyone knew it was Sadie’s mug.  Sadie wanted HR to issue a statement banning people from using other people’s mugs.  Bob just wanted a cup of tea.

If you are an HR Consultant and need someone to take notes of meetings, or provide general or HR specific administrative  support you can get in touch with me here.